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Nope.

I went to check my PO box again today.  Still no package.  But hey, why would there be, just because they said to allow two weeks, and it’s been over three now?  Sure, they said they mailed it last Wednesday, but I’m thinking now, that probably meant they processed it to go out for mailing, not that it actually entered the mail stream that day.  Like the letter they sent me that was dated the 20th but reached me the 26th.  That was postmarked the 22nd.  So just because they said they mailed it Wednesday, I’m figuring now that probably means they mailed it Friday.

So maybe I’ll receive it tomorrow.  Or maybe Thursday.  Or maybe they decided I was an uppity bitch, what with having the audacity to demand they actually send me my order, so they got pissed off at me and just tossed it in a dumpster.  Who knows?

You know, I work in a medical library.  I do interlibrary loan.  The National Library of Medicine sets standards we need to follow.  There are three levels of service on requests — one can request normal, rush, or urgent patient care service.

When we receive a normal request, we need to update as either filled or unfilled within three days.  If we don’t, the request will route on automatically for another library to try to fill.  At that point, even if we fill the request, we cannot charge the borrowing library.

When we receive a rush request, we need to fill it within 24 hours.  We need to fill urgent patient care requests within 3 hours.  We always try to fill both rush and urgent requests as soon as possible though.  We realize that the borrower wouldn’t request that level of service unless they really needed it now.  Sometimes someone is actually in surgery when they find something unexpected and want more information.  Yes, technically, we’re allowed to take up to 3 hours to fill their urgent patient care request, but are we going to?

Of course not!  We’ll send it as soon as we possibly can!  We’ve filled requests in as little as 5 minutes!  Obviously I don’t expect someone to get my medicine to me in 5 minutes.  You can’t email someone a bottle of pills.  But an institution needs to have standards in place, and the people working there need to understand that the standards exist for a reason — not to hassle the employees, but because someone’s health depends upon the job being done right.

I didn’t just order a shirt.  You want to put a shirt I ordered on backorder, fine.  Take a week to notify me, whatever.

This wasn’t a shirt.  This was medicine I need to make my brain work.  What kind of standards do they have for getting orders out in time?  What kind of understanding do employees have that their actions have an impact on customers’ health?  Any?  None?

Does anyone there realize they can’t just use the same business model as some company selling shirts?  (Actually, this may not even be a very good example.  Almost any company I’ve ordered clothing from in recent years has told me before I even placed the order if something was backordered, told me approximately when it would be available, notified me immediately if there was any problem, and gotten my order to me in less than a week from when I ordered it if it was in stock when I ordered it.  I think L.L.Bean would probably run a more efficient pharmacy than what Walgreen’s has managed to do.)

Gee, it’s a good thing I’m just waiting for the medicine I need to make my brain work, and not some drug to keep me from having a heart attack or going into a diabetic coma or something.

Yeah, ok, I’m ranting.  Sigh.  I don’t like my brain like this.

2 comments

  1. Lara

    Poor you!
    I’m (luckily) not on mad pills (always makes me smile when I call them that) anymore, but I remember how hard it was when I ran out.
    I hope you get your pills soon, and you keep your sense of humour 🙂

  2. Marcy

    That is seriously aggregious. I think you should find a way to contact the CEO or something. I would complain and keep complaining.
    Mail order is not a good way to get pills. I had a friend who was diabetic and used insulin. He had mail order, too, and was often running to the local pharmacy for insulin b/c the mail order place fucked stuff up. That’s something you really don’t want to be running out of.

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